Heaven's Wrath

The Protestant Reformation and Dutch West India Company in the Atlantic World

Danny L. Noorlander

  Tip: stuur dit boek door naar iemand anders! 
Heaven's Wrath

gebonden: € 39.50: GRATIS verzending! (NL)

ISBN: 9789087283308, 296 blz., September 2019, Engels
Formaat: 23.8 (h) x 16.0 (b) x 2.8 (d) cm. Gewicht: 636 gram.

Uitgever: Leiden University Press

beschrijving

How did Reformed Christianity, the public faith of the Netherlands, influence the Dutch experience abroad? How did the Reformed Church and the West India Company (WIC) interact in each setting? What effect did the major religious issues and divisions of the period have on the WIC and its directors, merchants, employees, settlers, and indigenous allies? Conversely, what effect did expansion have on Dutch Calvinism?
In answering these and other questions, D. L. Noorlander argues against prevailing understandings of the role of religion in the Dutch colonial enterprise, finding that the Dutch Reformed Church was integral to Dutch colonialism. The stereotype of the Dutch merchant is a man unconcerned with differences in theological doctrine and political ideology so long as business was brisk. Although this has some merit in the history of New Amsterdam, the broader colonial effort in the Atlantic and, indeed, around the globe was far more closely connected to religious institutions, doctrine, authority, and practice. So whereas the easy answer regarding the failure of the Dutch to set up a durable empire in North America supposes a causal connection between dominant commercial interest and the lack of concern for the settlements and religious missions that animated other European colonization efforts, Noorlander shows that one needs to look elsewhere for the causes of that failure. In so doing, he revises some core notions about the organization and aims of Dutch empire, the culture of the West India Company, and the very shape of Dutch society.

D. L. Noorlander is assistant professor of history at the State University of New York, Oneonta. He is coeditor of the journal New York History.

“This is an impressive, ambitious study that will change the conversation about religion, trade, and imperial expansion in the case of the Dutch. Heaven's Wrath exceeds all other work on the topic.”
— Evan Haefeli, Texas A&M University, and author of New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty.

“Heaven's Wrath shows Dr. Noorlander is absolutely qualified to tackle the theme of WIC and the Reformed Church, and is of the highest quality.”
— Willem Frijhoff, author of Fulfilling God's Mission.


Meer teksten en voorbeelden:

over de schrijver(s)D. L. Noorlander is assistant professor of history at the State University of New York, Oneonta. He is coeditor of the journal New York History.inhoudsopgaveContents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Role of Reformed Christianity in the Commercial and
Colonial Endeavors of the Dutch Golden Age
1. The Dutch Reformed Church and the World: The International Concerns
of the Calvinist Ministry 11
2 Faith and Worship in a Merchant Community: The Directors of
the Dutch West India Company
3. Baptized by Water and Fire: The Religious Rites of the Company’s
Early Fleets and Conquests
4. Planting the Lord’s Vineyard in Foreign Soil: Public Worship in
Early Dutch Forts and Settlements
5. Reformers in the Land of the Holy Cross: The Calvinist Mission
in Brazil before the Portuguese Revolt
6. Turmoil in the Garden of Eden: Dissent and Reform in New Netherland
and the Dutch Caribbean
7. The Harvest Was Great, the Laborers Few: Missionary Work among Africans
and Native Americans
8. God and Mammon in the Dutch Atlantic World: Conflict over Religious
Resources and Power
Conclusion: The Dutch Joint-Stock Companies and the Catholic Powers
in Comparative Perspective
Notes
Index
toelichtingHow did Reformed Christianity, the public faith of the Netherlands, influence the Dutch experience abroad? How did the Reformed Church and the West India Company (WIC) interact in each setting? What effect did the major religious issues and divisions of the period have on the WIC and its directors, merchants, employees, settlers, and indigenous allies? Conversely, what effect did expansion have on Dutch Calvinism?

In answering these and other questions, D. L. Noorlander argues against prevailing understandings of the role of religion in the Dutch colonial enterprise, finding that the Dutch Reformed Church was integral to Dutch colonialism. The stereotype of the Dutch merchant is a man unconcerned with differences in theological doctrine and political ideology so long as business was brisk. Although this has some merit in the history of New Amsterdam, the broader colonial effort in the Atlantic and, indeed, around the globe was far more closely connected to religious institutions, doctrine, authority, and practice. So whereas the easy answer regarding the failure of the Dutch to set up a durable empire in North America supposes a causal connection between dominant commercial interest and the lack of concern for the settlements and religious missions that animated other European colonization efforts, Noorlander shows that one needs to look elsewhere for the causes of that failure. In so doing, he revises some core notions about the organization and aims of Dutch empire, the culture of the West India Company, and the very shape of Dutch society.
  1. Leg in mijn winkelwagen!

Meer boekennieuws op Facebook.